National Museum of the Philippines

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The National Museum of the Philippines or NM is a government agency museum that includes research and conservation programs within the museum and throughout the archipelago. Admission is free to all museums and facilities for both local and foreign visitors.

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The #NationalMuseumPH receives another gift to the nation for the National Ethnographic Collection.

On behalf of a grateful nation, the National Museum of the Philippines’ Deputy Director-General for Museums Ana Labrador received a t’nalak woven by Manlilikha ng Bayan Lang Dulay donated by Atty. Emilio Marañon III on 12 September 2019.

The t’nalak - a woven abaca cloth associated with the T’boli - measures 527.78 x 50.8 cm. Atty. Marañon acquired the piece during his two-day visit during an official mission and chanced upon the residence-workshop of Lang Dulay in Lake Sebu, South Cotabato in October 2014. According to him, he saw on that visit a bamboo-tying frame in the room of Lang Dulay, which she has been working on every night before she went to sleep.

Atty. Marañon offered then to buy the piece and Lang Dulay agreed to sell it once completed. She told him that the design was inspired by the Allah River, which she described as both “complicated” and “difficult”. In addition she explained to him that she does the tying to incorporate the design in her dream but already felt too old and too weak to weave. The special feature of her t'nalak is that both ends of the it bear her name as her signature, distinguishing her work from the other master weavers in Lake Sebu.

Lang Dulay was recognized as a Manlilikha ng Bayan in 1998 for her finely woven t’nalak and traditional designs that are harder to complete compared to others. She learned the process of weaving at the age of 12 from her mother and through the years, she has mastered approximately a hundred designs, including bulinglangit (clouds), bangkiring (hair bangs), kabangi (butterfly), crocodiles, and flowers along with mountains and streams of Lake Sebu, her birthplace.

This donation was completed on 25 December 2014 and is one of the few last works of Lang Dulay before she died on 30 April 2015 at the age of 86. It will be included in the Manlilikha ng Bayan Hall scheduled for upgrading next year together with the recently turned-over works of Manlilikha ng Bayan Estelita Bantilan and Ambalang Ausalin from the GAMABA Secretariat of the National Commission for Culture and the Arts.

Besides the Lang Dulay t'nalak, Atty. Marañon has also donated woven prayer and sleeping mats from Balabac, Southern Palawan which were included in the recently concluded "Gifts to the Nation exhibition" at the NM of Fine Arts and in one of the permanent galleries devoted to Bangsamoro Art at the NM of Anthropology, "Faith, Tradition and Place". He is donating this t'nalak in honor of his late mother Luzviminda Marañon who recently passed away.

Text by MPTauro/NM Ethnology and photos from NM Ethnology and Atty. Marañon.

©The National Museum of the Philippines (2019)
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💕

Gina Rocafort Gatarin

More on archaeological study on the philippines, kaya pati water territory natin nawawala.. Part lang yang mga damit...

Apo Whang-Od! Kelan isasama?

Wayne Tabion Gandang ganda talaga ako sa T'nalak

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Quadrícula (HOCUS II): The Hofileña-Custodio Paintings

A new exhibition is opening at the National Museum of Fine Arts entitled Quadrícula (HOCUS II), which refers to the grid pattern used by the Spanish conquerors to lay out towns where Christianized Indios were forced to settle, beginning late 16th century. The quadrícula, represented the Spanish conquest of the Philippines. The HOCUS II are Hofileñas’ visions of the religious, political and socioeconomic consequences of Spanish rule and how the Filipino Indios coped with it.

This exhibition alludes to the first HOCUS painting exhibition in 2017 also at the National Museum, referring to its unique collaborative artworks of a historian and a painter. Saul Hofileña Jr. is a lawyer and historian who cannot paint to save his life; Guy Custodio is the painter who is oblivious of history. Hofileña has riveting visions in his mind about our colonial history, the concepts of each painting are his alone. Custodio interprets Hofileña’s “visions” on antique wood and canvas with masterly brushstrokes. HOCUS is the acronym of their names, they do not sign their names on the paintings; their signature is an icon, the Anghel de cuyacuy, a winged Indio in a white tunic, reading a book while jiggling one leg and propping the other, which is a custom among Filipino males.

Gemma Cruz-Araneta, former director of the National Museum of the Philippines curated the HOCUS I exhibition. She has been invited again to curate, this time the Quadrícula (HOCUSII). Expect a similar series of lectures by distinguished personalities in art, history, and heritage conservation will be offered to the public as was held during the run of the HOCUS I exhibition.

The Quadrícula (HOCUS II) exhibition will run from September 17, 2019 until March 15, 2020 at Galleries XXVII and XXVIII, fourth floor, National Museum of Fine Arts. Museum hours are from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. daily except on Mondays and Holidays. For more information, please call the Museum Services Division at (02) 298 1100 (local 2008) or email services.nationalmuseumph@gmail.com.

#NationalMuseumPH
#PHCivilServiceAt119

Text and poster by NM Fine Arts Division

©The National Museum of the Philippines (2019)
... See MoreSee Less

Quadrícula (HOCUS II): The Hofileña-Custodio Paintings 

A new exhibition is opening at the National Museum of Fine Arts entitled Quadrícula (HOCUS II), which refers to  the  grid pattern used by the Spanish conquerors to lay out towns where Christianized Indios were forced to settle, beginning late 16th century. The quadrícula, represented the Spanish conquest of the Philippines. The HOCUS II are Hofileñas’ visions of  the religious, political and  socioeconomic consequences of Spanish rule and how the Filipino Indios coped with it. 

This exhibition alludes to the  first HOCUS painting exhibition in 2017 also at the National Museum, referring to its unique collaborative artworks of a historian and a painter. Saul Hofileña Jr. is a lawyer and historian who cannot paint to save his life;  Guy Custodio is the painter who is oblivious of history. Hofileña has riveting visions in his mind  about our colonial history, the concepts of each painting are his alone. Custodio interprets Hofileña’s “visions” on antique wood and canvas with masterly brushstrokes. HOCUS is the acronym of their names, they do not sign their names on the paintings; their signature is an icon, the Anghel de cuyacuy, a winged Indio in a white tunic, reading a book while jiggling one leg and propping the other, which is a custom among Filipino males.   

Gemma Cruz-Araneta, former director of the National Museum of the Philippines curated the HOCUS I exhibition. She has been invited again to curate, this time the Quadrícula (HOCUSII). Expect a similar series of  lectures by distinguished personalities in art, history, and heritage conservation  will be offered to the public as was held during the run of the HOCUS I exhibition.

The Quadrícula (HOCUS II) exhibition will run from September 17, 2019 until March 15, 2020 at Galleries XXVII and XXVIII, fourth floor, National Museum of Fine Arts. Museum hours are from 10:00  a.m. to 5:00 p.m. daily except on Mondays and Holidays. For more information, please call the Museum Services Division at (02) 298 1100 (local 2008) or email services.nationalmuseumph@gmail.com.

#NationalMuseumPH
#PHCivilServiceAt119

Text and poster by NM Fine Arts Division

©The National Museum of the Philippines (2019)

The #NationalMuseumPH receives gifts to the nation from two recently proclaimed Manlilikha ng Bayan Ambalang Ausalin and Estelita Bantilan.

Yakan weaver Ambalang Ausalin donated one of her backstrap looms and a Seputangan with alang-alang design. While three igem or mats with sulif design and 6 rolls of natural and dried Romblon leaves were given by Blaan Estelita Bantilan. These will be on displayed next year in an upgraded GAMABA Hall at the National Museum of Anthropology.

Photos courtesy of the NM Ethnology Division.

©The National Museum of the Philippines (2019)
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Wow. Sana maituro ito sa schools.

Is it open on week ends?

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